Category Archives: Clinical pathology

Includes news relating to lab diagnosis of medical conditions.
Discipline groups are Microbiology, Immunology, Anatomical Pathology including cytopathology (cancers etc), Chemical pathology, Haematology and Laboratory management.
EXCLUDES imaging technologies.

Cancer gene test ‘would save lives’

BBC News

Younger bowel cancer patients should be offered a genetic test to screen for a rare condition linked to a higher risk of further cancers, say researchers.
Genetic screening of tumours would save lives and would be cost-effective for the NHS, a new study has confirmed.
Lynch syndrome raises the risk of developing cancer, particularly bowel cancer and womb and ovarian cancers.

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Link to HTA report

 

Drug that stops bowel cancer growth in 80 per cent of cases uncovered by Melbourne researchers

ABC News David Mark 2 October 2014

Australian scientists have discovered a set of drugs that stop the growth of bowel cancers in about 80 to 90 per cent of cases.
Dr Toby Phesse, from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research in Melbourne, said new forms of treatment for this type of cancer are in high demand.
“About 4,000 people are going to die of [bowel] cancer every year in Australia, and so we’re really crying out for new therapies to try and target this disease,” Dr Phesse said.
“And our lab is specifically looking for targeted strategies to try and work out which signalling pathways or which genes could be targeted to try and prevent this cancer.”

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Most wait times for cancer surgery within 30 days: report
Link to NHPA report

 

Gene mutation discovered in blood disorder

EurekAlert October 1, 2014 John Ascenzi

An international team of scientists has identified a gene mutation that causes aplastic anemia, a serious blood disorder in which the bone marrow fails to produce normal amounts of blood cells. Studying a family in which three generations had blood disorders, the researchers discovered a defect in a gene that regulates telomeres, chromosomal structures with crucial roles in normal cell function.

Request the source article from Information & Research Services (QH Staff only)

Source article: Guo Y et al, “Inherited bone marrow failure associated with germline mutation of ACD, the gene encoding telomere protein TPP1,” Blood, published online Sept 9, 2014. http://doi.org/10.1182/blood-2014-08-596445

Researchers develop new DNA sequencing method to diagnose tuberculosis

(PeerJ 23 September 2014) Researchers working in the UK and The Gambia, have developed a new approach to the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) that relies on direct sequencing of DNA extracted from sputum — a technique called metagenomics — to detect and characterize the bacteria that cause TB without the need for time-consuming culture of bacteria in the laboratory.

Read EurekAlert Summary

 

Researchers develop new DNA sequencing method to diagnose tuberculosis

(PeerJ 23 September 2014) Researchers working in the UK and The Gambia, have developed a new approach to the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) that relies on direct sequencing of DNA extracted from sputum — a technique called metagenomics — to detect and characterize the bacteria that cause TB without the need for time-consuming culture of bacteria in the laboratory.

Read EurekAlert Summary

View full-text open-access article

Allergy expert Janet Davies has isolated the allergen that triggers hay fever in people allergic to Bahia grass

Coureir Mail janelle Miles 28 September 2014

QUEENSLAND researchers have developed a cheap and reliable blood test that detects one of the most common causes of severe hay fever, paving the way for better treatments.

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Simple blood test could be used as tool for early cancer diagnosis

EurekAlert 25-Sep-2014

High levels of calcium in blood, a condition known as hypercalcaemia, can be used by GPs as an early indication of certain types of cancer, according to a study by researchers from the universities of Bristol and Exeter.
Hypercalcaemia is the most common metabolic disorder associated with cancer, occurring in 10 to 20 per cent of people with cancer. While its connection to cancer is well known, this study has, for the first time, shown that often it can predate the diagnosis of cancer in primary care.
A simple blood test could identify those with hypercalcaemia, prompting doctors to investigate further.
The research, published in the British Journal of Cancer, analysed the electronic records of 54,000 patients who had elevated levels of calcium and looked at how many of them went on to receive a cancer diagnosis.

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Link to full-text article in BJC