Category Archives: Heavy metals / trace elements

Environment and biological, Trace metals and heavy metals, trace elements in environmental samples, trace metals in biological materials.
Queensland focus.

Traditional Ayurvedic medicines without TGA registration may have toxic levels of heavy metals

The Conversation Ian Musgrave 27 July 2014

Traditional Indian (Ayurvedic) medicine uses a variety of treatment modalities, from massage to herbal remedies. Ayurvedic herbal remedies are usually complex, and some may contain ground up gemstones, pearls or even heavy metals.

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Royal Society of Chemistry’s flagship journal goes Gold open access

(Royal Society of Chemistry 15 July 2014) The Royal Society of Chemistry’s flagship journal, Chemical Science, is going Gold open access from 2015 — making it the world’s first high-quality open access chemistry journal.

The Royal Society of Chemistry’s flagship journal, Chemical Science, is going Gold open access from 2015 – making it the world’s first high-quality open access chemistry journal.  From January 2015 onwards, all new content in Chemical Science will be free for anyone to access.

To ease the transition to open access, the Royal Society of Chemistry is waiving all Article Processing Charges (APCs) for two years.

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View RSC Chemical Science webpage

More children at risk from lead dust

The Australian Sarah Martin July 17, 2014

MORE than half of all children living in the industrial centres of Mount Isa, Port Pirie and Broken Hill will be considered at risk under new national guidelines for lead in blood levels.
After a three-year review, the National Health and Medical Research Council yesterday released a draft report recommending the intervention level for blood-lead levels be halved from 10 micrograms per decilitre of blood to 5mcg/dL.

NHMRC Media Release

Link to NHMRC Draft Report

Low doses of arsenic cause cancer in male mice

(NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences 8 July 2014) Mice exposed to low doses of arsenic in drinking water, similar to what some people might consume, developed lung cancer, researchers at the National Institutes of Health have found.

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Infant toenails reveal in utero exposure to low-level arsenic, Dartmouth study finds

(Dartmouth College 7 July 2014) Infant toenails are a reliable way to estimate arsenic exposure before birth, a Dartmouth College study shows.

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Register for the new CKN (Clinicians’ Knowledge Network)

Queensland Health’s new CKN is now available.  The CKN provides access to a range of Point of Care resources as well as Medicines resources such as MIMS Online and Micromedex.

The new CKN has been designed for more modern web browsers, giving you better access to journals and other resources.  It is best viewed in Mozilla Firefox which is provided on all Qld Health computers.  Please don’t use Internet Explorer 6 (IE6).

If you have old CKN links saved in your web browser bookmarks or favourites you will need to update them. Your old saved links will no longer work.

To access the new CKN from home or off-site, you will need to re-register.

Click here to re-register for CKN access

Lead in kids’ blood linked with behavioral and emotional problems

(NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences 30 June 2014) Emotional and behavioral problems show up even with low exposure to lead, and as blood lead levels increase in children, so do the problems, according to research funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health. The results were published online June 30 in the journal JAMA Pediatrics.

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Book review: Poisoned Planet

The Conversation Tony McMichael 25 June 2014

The World Health Organization estimates that one in every 12 deaths worldwide is due to chemical exposure, sometimes acute but mostly chronic. This eclipses the annual death tolls from malaria, car crashes and HIV/AIDS.

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Another concern arises over groundwater contamination from fracking accidents

(American Chemical Society 25 June 2014) The oil and gas extraction method known as hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, could potentially contribute more pollutants to groundwater than past research has suggested, according to a new study in ACS’ journal Environmental Science & Technology. Scientists are reporting that when spilled or deliberately applied to land, waste fluids from fracking are likely picking up tiny particles in the soil that attract heavy metals and other chemicals with possible health implications for people and animals.

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Various genes could be used as early biomarkers of stress due to heavy metals

(Elhuyar Fundazioa 23 June 2014) Various genes of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana and of the bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens could be used as early biomarkers of stress due to heavy metals, according to the Ph.D. thesis of María Teresa Gómez-Sagasti, researcher at Neiker-Tecnalia and the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country.

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