Category Archives: Microbiology

Food and water microbiology | Legionella | Salmonella | Giardia | Cryptosporidium | E coli | Camphlobacter | Cholera | Shigella | Yersinia | plague | enteric pathogens | foodborne illnesses | food spoilage | source of food poisoning outbreaks | population health | communicable diseases | hospital infection | gastrointestinal disease outbreaks | epidemiology | child care centres | aged care homes.
Includes outbreaks in new diseases in veterinary context in relation to potential to transmit to humans.
Dialysis | dialysate.
Meningococcus | Neisseria | gonorrhea | meningitis.
Molecular biology typing | molecular biology sequencing

Gate for bacterial toxins found

(University of Freiburg 16 April 2014) Prof. Dr. Dr. Klaus Aktories and Dr. Panagiotis Papatheodorou from the University of Freiburg have discovered the receptor responsible for smuggling the toxin of the bacterium Clostridium perfringens into the cell. The TpeL toxin is formed by C. perfringens, a pathogen that causes gas gangrene and food poisoning. It is very similar to the toxins of many other hospital germs of the genus Clostridium. Aktories is member of the BIOSS Centre for Biological Signalling Studies.

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Brisbane’s southside lags in vaccination take-up rates

Courier Mail Laura Chalmers 17 April 2014

WIDE discrepancies in vaccination rates are occurring across Brisbane with pockets of Brisbane’s south recording levels as low as 86 per cent, compared to 96 per cent in parts of Brisbane’s north.  Across the state, the vaccination rate is estimated by Queensland Health to be 91.5 per cent.

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Returning overseas holidaymakers bringing measles, typhoid and whooping cough into Queensland

Courier Mail Laura Chalmers 16 April 2014

ALMOST 50 Queenslanders have brought deadly vaccine-preventable diseases back into the country from overseas holidays in the past three years.

Data from the state’s Health Department shows diseases such as measles, typhoid and whooping cough are being carried back into Queensland by adults who don’t vaccinate before their vacation.

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How coughs and sneezes float farther than you think

(Massachusetts Institute of Technology 8 April 2014) A novel study uncovers the way coughs and sneezes stay airborne for long distances.

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Awareness campaign shows signs of delaying onset of drug-resistant gonorrhea in UK

(Society for General Microbiology 14 April 2014) Gonorrhea threatens to become resistant to all antibiotics used to treat it. Professor Cathy Ison will today show that campaigns in the UK to raise awareness of drug resistance have shown some success in slowing onset of treatment failure.

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Plague alters cell death to kill host

(Northwestern University 14 April 2014) Research at Northwestern Medicine has uncovered how the bacteria that cause pneumonic plague can subvert apoptotic cell death by directly destroying Fas ligand. The effect is a disrupted immune response during infection, which allows Y. pestis to overwhelm the lungs, causing death.

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Genome sequencing of MRSA infection predicts disease severity

(Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory) April 9, 2014 -The spread of the antibiotic-resistant pathogen MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) remains a concerning public health problem, especially among doctors trying to determine appropriate treatment options for infected patients. In a study published online today in Genome Research, researchers used the genome sequence of MRSA to predict which isolates were highly toxic, thus potentially personalizing the treatment of individual MRSA infections.

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Antimicrobial from soaps promotes bacteria buildup in human noses

(American Society for Microbiology 8 April 2014) An antimicrobial agent found in common household soaps, shampoos and toothpastes may be finding its way inside human noses where it promotes the colonization of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria and could predispose some people to infection. Researchers at the University of Michigan report their findings this week in a study published in mBio®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

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Whooping cough vaccine loses its effectiveness

Sydney Morning Herald Lucy Carroll 14 April 2014

The bacteria that causes deadly whooping cough has mutated to more easily evade its vaccine, potentially putting hundreds of thousands of children at risk.  A study by NSW researchers has found almost 80 per cent of whooping cough cases analysed were caused by a mutated bacteria that had stopped producing pertactin – one of the three key proteins targeted by the vaccine.

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Federal Health Department plan to send out vaccination reminder letters

Courier Mail Laura Chalmers 15 April 2014

PARENTS of children who are overdue for vaccination at one, two and five years of age will automatically receive reminder letters, in a measure to be introduced to boost immunisation rates.

The Federal Health Department is working on a proposal – to be implemented as early as December – to automatically generate mail to any parent who falls behind on their child’s immunisation schedule.

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