Tag Archives: Open access publishing

2014 Open Access Survey: examining the changing views of Taylor & Francis authors

Taylor and Francis Open Access July 2014

In the first few months of 2014 Taylor & Francis carried out a worldwide survey, with the aim of exploring journal authors’ views on open access.

Having previously conducted a survey on open access in 2013, we have been able to see how authors’ opinions have developed, and whether the discussion and debate on open access has helped to inform and shape views.

With responses to both the 2013 and 2014 survey given side-by-side, you can easily see how attitudes have changed. Alongside this, the 2014 survey explores many new areas and gives a fascinating insight into authors’ current perceptions of open access.

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‘Unreliable’ Articles, ‘Trial By Literature’ Revisited

New York Law Journal 12 May 2014

This column revisits a challenging topic that cuts across the spectrum of complex litigation—the reliance upon and use of unreliable hearsay literature by expert testifiers. Often these are technical or scientific articles published in some journal with a claim that the published work product has been “peer reviewed.”

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See also  ‘Unreliable’ Articles: More on Peer Review’s Frailties

 

Let’s shine a light on paywalls that deny open access to scientific research

The Guardian Tania Browne 29 April 2014

The scientific publishing world is dominated by journals produced by companies such as Elsevier, Nature Publishing Group and Wiley. Journals are the basic scientific currency, the way ideas are communicated. But they’re often only available by subscription, and most subscribers are academic institutions and libraries. Readers usually rely on being part of an organisation that subscribes to them because subscriptions cost a small fortune. In fact, the subscription price of journals has risen at nearly four times the rate of inflation since 1986, so it’s hard to keep up any other way. Even some institutions and libraries are now dropping subscriptions to journals – they can no longer afford it. And as neither the authors of published papers nor the experts who carry out peer review for the journals are paid for their work, such charges can seem perplexing.

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Scientific Publishing: An Industry in Flux

Synapse: the ucsf student newspaper Alexandra Greer 27 March 2014

For scientists around the world, the open access movement has radically changed how journal articles are read and distributed by offering an alternative to the dominant subscription-based access model. Today, anyone can access at least some scientific articles on the web. In this three-part series, we examine the impact of open access journals on the scientific publishing industry.

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PLOS’ New Data Policy: Public Access to Data

PLOS Blogs Liz Silva 24 February 2014

Access to research results, immediately and without restriction, has always been at the heart of PLOS’ mission and the wider Open Access movement. However, without similar access to the data underlying the findings, the article can be of limited use. For this reason, PLOS has always required that authors make their data available to other academic researchers who wish to replicate, reanalyze, or build upon the findings published in our journals.

In an effort to increase access to this data, we are now revising our data-sharing policy for all PLOS journals: authors must make all data publicly available, without restriction, immediately upon publication of the article. Beginning March 3rd, 2014, all authors who submit to a PLOS journal will be asked to provide a Data Availability Statement, describing where and how others can access each dataset that underlies the findings. This Data Availability Statement will be published on the first page of each article.

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Riled up by Elsevier’s take-downs? Time to embrace open access

The Conversation 13 December 2013

The publishing giant Elsevier owns much of the world’s academic knowledge, in the form of article copyright. In the past few weeks it has stepped up enforcement of its property rights, issuing “take-down notices” to Academia.edu, where many researchers post PDFs of their articles.
The articles in question were published in Elsevier-owned journals, and are legally available only by subscription, often at exorbitant prices.

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Open Access the key to ivory towers

Sydney Morning Herald Asa Wahlquist 21 November 2013

One Australian university is pushing the boundaries of unrestricted access to its scholarly research.

t is one of the greatest challenges so far to the claim that academics live in ivory towers. Peer-reviewed research from academics at the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) will soon be available to the general public, free of charge, on iTunes, the so-called jukebox software used to download music, film and book files.

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American Chemical Society extends new open access program designed to assist authors

American Chemical Society 1 November 2013) ACS Publications, a leading scientific journal publisher and a Division of the American Chemical Society, announced today a far-reaching expansion of its open access publishing options — including a major new open access journal, more licensing choices for authors and a stimulus program to support authors who select ACS journals when seeking to publish their work open access. The programs will be featured at the annual Charleston Library Conference in Charleston, S.C.

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Link to ACS Open Access site

Hoax highlights the pitfalls and perils of open access publishing

The Conversation James Bradley 4 November 2013

Open access has become the catch-cry of academic science, demanding all research be freely available to anyone. But it leaves open the question of how publishers are to make money.

Science, the widely respected magazine of the American Association for the Advancement of Science recently commissioned a sting operation aimed at revealing serious abuses within the world of open access publishing.

Predatory open-access publishing is discussed.

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Scientists must share early and share often to boost citations

The Conversation 1 October 2013

Publish or perish” is a well-known maxim within academia.

A paper published overnight by American researchers Heather Piwowar and Todd Vision in the open access journal PeerJ has finally reliably demonstrated what many data sharing advocates have been saying for a long time.

Far from hurting the ability to publish, sharing data in a public repository can actually lead to a tangible benefit to your publication record through increased citations.

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