Tag Archives: Salmonella

Salmonella sensing system

(American Institute of Physics 18 October 2013) Foodborne illnesses spread easily and, as such, are a difficult-to-control problem — even more so in developing nations. Quick detection can play a critical role in halting the spread of contamination. Traditional detection methods, however, tend to be haltingly slow. Recognizing the need for a real-time biosensing system to detect pathogenic bacteria, a team at Auburn University came up with a novel design, which they describe in the AIP’s Journal of Applied Physics.

Read EurekAlert Summary

Request a copy of the article (QH Staff only)

Device speeds concentration step in food-pathogen detection

EurekAlert 14 October 2013

Researchers have developed a system that concentrates foodborne salmonella and other pathogens faster than conventional methods by using hollow thread-like fibers that filter out the cells, representing a potential new tool for speedier detection. The machine, called a continuous cell concentration device, could make it possible to routinely analyze food or water samples to screen for pathogens within a single work shift at food processing plants.

Read more →

Antibiotic / antimicrobial resistance: threat report 2013

This report, Antibiotic resistance threats in the United States, 2013 gives a first-ever snapshot of the burden and threats posed by the antibiotic-resistant germs having the most impact on human health.

For a one-page summary see the CIDRAP article CDC: Antibiotic-resistant bugs sicken 2 million a year, or at Nature CDC issues report on controlling antibiotic resistance.

Read download the full report:  Antibiotic resistance threats in the United States, 2013

Livestock ‘not salmonella source’

BBC News 12 September 2013

Livestock may have been wrongly blamed as being the source of a type of drug-resistant salmonella, a study shows.  UK researchers examined the DNA from 373 humans and animals infected with a specific type of salmonella collected by a Scottish lab over 22 years.

Read more

Request the source article from Information & Research Services (QH Staff only)

Researchers track antibiotic-resistant strains of Salmonella from farm to fork

(Penn State 29 August 2013) Continuing research on Salmonella may enable researchers to identify and track strains of antibiotic resistant bacteria as they evolve and spread, according to researchers in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences.

Read EurekAlert Summary

Request the source article from Information & Research Services (QH Staff only)

Probiotic bacterium lessens severity of Salmonella infections by hoarding iron

(University of California – Irvine 17 July 2013) UC Irvine microbiologists have learned how a probiotic bacterium used to treat irritable bowel syndrome can soothe gut bacterial infections caused by salmonella, paving the way for potential relief from foodborne illnesses that affect millions of people annually.

Read EurekAlert Summary

Request the source article from Information & Research Services (QH Staff only)

Whole chickens from farmers markets may have more pathogenic bacteria

(Penn State 11 July 2013) Raw, whole chickens purchased from farmers markets throughout Pennsylvania contained significantly higher levels of bacteria that can cause foodborne illness compared to those purchased from grocery stores in the region, according to a small-scale study by researchers in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences.

Read EurekAlert Summary

Request the source article from Information & Research Services (QH Staff only)

Click here to download Masters Thesis - A Microbiological Comparison of Poultry Products Obtained From Farmers’ Markets and Supermarkets in Pennsylvania (170 pp)

Researchers develop a faster method to identify Salmonella strains

(Penn State 3 June 2013) A new approach may be able to reduce by more than half the time it takes health officials to identify Salmonella strains, according to researchers in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences.

Read EurekAlert Summary

Request the source article from Information & Research Services (QH Staff only)

Inhibition of polymerase chain reaction for the detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica on walnut kernels

Kyle Ganz & Alex Gill. Food Microbiology 35(1): 15-20 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fm.2013.02.002

The aim of this study was to determine whether Escherichia coli O157:H7 can be reliably detected and isolated from walnut kernels using standard methods of analysis. The limit of detection approached 1 cell per analytical unit (25 g) for E. coli O157:H7 on walnut kernels enriched in modified tryptic soy broth with 20 μg/ml novobiocin and plating onto selective agar media. The presence of PCR inhibitors in walnut kernels was indicated by the failure to detect E. coli O157:H7 from culture positive enrichment broths analysed by PCR, with two separate polymerase and reagent compositions (Dupont BAX E. coli O157:H7 MP system, Promega GoTaq Green for stx) and three methods of template preparation (DuPont BAX, Qiagen DNeasy, Bio-Rad InstaGene). PCR inhibition was overcome by 1:100 dilution in TE buffer of the DNeasy or InstaGene template. PCR inhibition was not relieved by dilution of the BAX template. Similar results were observed for walnut kernels inoculated with Salmonella enterica and analysed for invA, indicating that PCR inhibition is not specific to the organism or primer/template. These results indicate that analysis of walnut kernels for pathogens should be with culture based methods or use protocols for DNA template preparation modified to remove or dilute inhibitors and the need for internal amplification controls in PCR methods.

Click here to read full text

Enter the Library username and password at the login window (top right of screen). Contact the library if you require assistance.

HPA study shows poor hygiene practices at mobile vendors

Health Protection Agency 13 March 2013

Research from the Health Protection Agency (HPA) has revealed that food, water, chopping boards, cleaning cloths and security wristbands sampled from mobile and outdoor food vendors were contaminated with a range of bacteria including E.coli. This bacteria, which originates from human or animal faeces indicates either poor hygiene, undercooking or cross-contamination in the kitchen.

Read more.

The report can be found from the HPA website’s LG Regulation Reports page.