Killer of Gold Coast businessman Sam Dhody pleads guilty to murder

Gold Coast Bulletin Emmaline Stigwood  July 31, 2015

A MAN accused of shooting Southport businessman Sam Dhody has this morning pleaded guilty to murder.
Adam James Gooley appeared in the Supreme Court in Brisbane where he pleaded guilty to murdering Shyam “Sam’’ Dhody in 2013.

Read more: http://www.goldcoastbulletin.com.au/news/crime-court/killer-of-gold-coast-businessman-sam-dhody-pleads-guilty-to-murder/story-fnje8bkv-1227464668890?from=gold+coast+bulletin_rss

Emerald man jailed over housemate sledgehammer death as court rules manslaughter not murder

ABC News Jess Lodge 31 July 2015

A man from Emerald, in central Queensland, who bashed his housemate to death with a sledgehammer, has been jailed for seven and a half years.
A Supreme Court jury in Rockhampton took seven hours to find David John Cooper not guilty of murder but guilty of the manslaughter of Ernie Peterson, 36, in Emerald in 2013.

Read more

First Smartphone DNA Test for Chlamydia to Be Presented at 2015 AACC Annual Meeting

PR Newswire July 29, 2015

At the 2015 AACC Annual Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo, researchers will present findings that a first-of-its-kind smartphone test for chlamydia can detect the disease with high accuracy, which could reduce the prevalence of this sexually transmitted disease (STD) by making chlamydia screening easier and cheaper.
Most people with chlamydia are not aware of it because the infection often causes no symptoms, but if left untreated, this STD can develop into pelvic inflammatory disease and irreversibly damage a woman’s reproductive system. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, pelvic inflammatory disease affects up to 30% of women with chlamydia, and can cause infertility; debilitating, chronic pelvic pain; and life-threatening ectopic pregnancies. Over the past decade, healthcare providers have been able to expand screening programs for chlamydia thanks to the development of a highly sensitive method known as nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT). NAATs are too complex, however, to perform in point-of-care settings such as physicians’ offices, health fairs, school clinics, or other sexual health outreach venues, and they also have a high per-test cost.

Read more

Industry News: 2015 International Symposium on Human Identification (ISHI) Welcomes 50+ International Forensic DNA Experts

BusinessWire 28 Jul 2015

Join more than 50 experts at the world’s largest conference on DNA analysis for human identification, featuring historic keynote speaker Kirk Bloodsworth, the first person to be exonerated from death row through post-conviction DNA testing. The 26th International Symposium on Human Identification (ISHI) 2015, to be held October 12–October 15 in Grapevine, Texas, includes presentations from leading professionals in the fields of forensic DNA analysis, genomics, forensic anthropology, medical molecular diagnostics, law enforcement and more.

ISHI 26 comprises a 3-day series of presentations complemented by optional small group workshops. Experts on forensic DNA practices and technological advances presenting during the event include…

Read more: http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20150728005122/en/2015-International-Symposium-Human-Identification-ISHI-Welcomes#.VbrFgVLc_pg

ISHI Symposium link: http://ishinews.com/

Forensic labs explore blind testing to prevent errors

Science AAAS Kelly Servick 3o July 2015

Last week, at the first International Symposium on Forensic Science Error Management in Arlington, Virginia, nearly 500 forensic scientists, crime lab managers, and other practitioners confronted the factors that have led to unreliable results in the field. A key problem, many said, is that people who evaluate evidence from crime scenes have access to information about a case that could bias their analysis. That subconscious bias could arise from irrelevant contextual information, such as the nature of the crime or police investigators’ beliefs about a suspect’s guilt, or from the physical evidence itself. As forensics struggles to recover from revelations of serious flaws in its methodology and scientific underpinnings, more labs are considering ways to shield their examiners from potential bias.

Read at source: http://news.sciencemag.org/people-events/2015/07/forensic-labs-explore-blind-testing-prevent-errors

Request the source article from Information & Research Services (QH Staff only)

 

Farm employers ‘manipulate’ female backpackers into sexual acts in return for Australian visa sign-off

ABC News Katri Uibu 31 July 2015

Travellers are being coerced into performing sexual acts in return for farm employers signing off on backpacker visa applications, Queensland’s Anti-Discrimination Commissioner (ADCQ) says.
Kevin Cocks has told the ABC some employers are withholding signing off on visa applications in order to manipulate travellers.
Backpackers who have come to Australia on a one-year Working Holiday (subclass 417) visa are required to undertake at least three months of work in regional or rural Australia in order to qualify for a second year.

Read more

Skin donor ‘heroes’ help north Queensland burns victim Dave Andersen recover

ABC News Leonie Mellor 29 July 2015

A Queensland man dubbed a walking miracle after suffering burns to 90 per cent of his body is helping spread the word that donating skin can save lives.

Read more