Category Archives: Counselling

Coronial counselling, bereavement, grief, complicated grief particularly in regard with violent/unexpected deaths.
This category relates to coronial counsellors who work with families including children whose loved ones have had autopsy. This category may also deal with the counselling families / individuals and requests for tissue donation from the autopsy.

Queensland Easter road toll the highest on record, while police crack down on drink and drugs

Courier Mail Rhian Deutrom, Tom Snowdon 7 April 2015

A four-year-old Kingston boy, identified only as Tiari, was the youngest to die on the state’s roads when he was hit by a car outside his home on Easter Sunday.

Local funeral director Jules Hetet said Tiari’s family were still desperate to visit him in the John Tonge mortuary, which was closed over the Easter period.

“In the Maori community when someone passes, a person is always with the body so this time has been really difficult for them,” Ms Hetet said.

“They’re at a complete loss, they can’t do anything and he’s up there alone. It is traumatic for them coping with his passing as well as not being with him.”

By yesterday, 55,579 drink-driving tests had been completed across the state, returning 303 positive results. In the same period last year, 85,828 were completed. Drug-driving offences have also risen sharply, with one in nine drivers testing positive for a substance, up from one in 22 last Easter.

Read more:  http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/queensland-easter-road-toll-the-highest-on-record-while-police-crack-down-on-drink-and-drugs/story-fnihsrk2-1227293457090

Death Studies Volume 39 Issue 1 2015 – Contents pages

Table of Contents | Vol 39 Issue 1 2015

Click here to request a copy/copies of any of the articles (QH Staff only)

Selected articles:

Barriers to Care and Service Satisfaction Following Homicide Loss: Associations With Mental Health Outcomes

Rookie cops need death training: Queensland research

Brisbane Times AAP 16 March 2015

Rookie police officers tasked with investigating non-criminal deaths don’t have the skills to do it tactfully, a new study has found.

The Queensland University of Technology research explores the issue of non-violent deaths and whether police engage tactfully with bereaved family or relatives.

Researcher Belinda Carpenter found reports prepared for the coroner by the younger officers were also “sloppy”.
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She said they would less likely be overwhelmed if their training was extended to include time at the morgue and observing autopsies.

Read more:  http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/queensland/rookie-cops-need-death-training-queensland-research-20150316-1m0em0.html

Read EurekAlert Summary

Request the source article from Information & Research Services (QH Staff only)

Family of suspected SIDS baby call for WA forensic changes

Perth Now AAP March 03, 2015

THE family of a newborn baby boy who died of suspected SIDS say it was devastating to delay his funeral three weeks because Western Australia’s only forensic neuropathologist was on leave.
Mason Martin was just three-weeks-old when he died on February 4 and he was not cremated until almost three weeks later, prompting his grieving family to call for a review of the state’s forensic services.
“The trauma of that was something that the whole family had to come to terms with,” Mason’s grandfather Graham Hood told 6PR Radio.
The family had wanted to avoid an autopsy so Mason would not be “carved up” but were told it would take a Supreme Court injunction. If they wanted an immediate funeral, the family had to accept the body without Mason’s brain.
“We were all gutted,” Mr Hood said.
When the neuropathologist returned from leave, the family had to wait another four days because she only worked at the state mortuary one day a week.

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Family of suspected SIDS baby call for WA forensic changes

Perth Now AAP 3 March 2015

THE family of a newborn baby boy who died of suspected SIDS say it was devastating to delay his funeral three weeks because Western Australia’s only forensic neuropathologist was on leave.  Protocols had prohibited the mother from touching her baby until he had been in the mortuary fridge for three weeks.

Mason Martin was just three-weeks-old when he died on February 4 and he was not cremated until almost three weeks later, prompting his grieving family to call for a review of the state’s forensic services.

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Cairns’ child killer case in court

Sydney Morning Herald Cleo Fraser January 30, 2015

A Cairns mother accused of murdering eight children could have her case heard by Queensland’s Mental Health Court.
Raina Mersane Ina Thaiday, 37, the mother of seven of the children and aunt to the eighth, was charged with eight counts of murder after the children were found dead at a Manoora home last month.
Her case was briefly mentioned in the Cairns Magistrates Court on Friday, but she wasn’t present.
Magistrate Suzette Coates adjourned the case for three months to allow a number of reports to be finalised.

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Top 5 under 40 – giving a voice to science thinkers

University of NSW 3 December 2014

UNSW and ABC Radio National today launched Top 5 under 40, an exciting initiative to discover a new generation of science thinkers and give them a voice.

Applications are now open for outstanding early-career researchers under the age of 40 who are working in Australian universities and research institutions across science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medical research.

Apply now: Early-career researchers who meet the scheme’s criteria have until Friday 16 January 2015 to  apply online.

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