Category Archives: Forensic DNA

Crime scene evidence, victims of crime, suspects allegedly involved in crimes and other persons of interest, analysis of blood, semen and saliva for DNA traces, major crime, volume crime (eg property crimes), evidence given at courts and in trials (expert evidence), CrimTrac, Disaster victim identification, missing persons, decomposed remains, new developments in methodology or equipment.
Focus on Queensland issues unless broader implications within the science (i.e. evidence challenged, legislation challenged, improvements in procedures etc)

Tyson Taylor found guilty of murdering Brisbane referee Tony McGrath

ABC News 24 May 2016

Tyson John Taylor has been found guilty of both murder and attempted murder of Brisbane rugby league referee Tony McGrath.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-05-24/tyson-taylor-guilty-of-tony-mcgrath-murder/7437552

 

Human remains found on Laidley West property, near Brisbane, yet to be identified

ABC News Matt Watson 24 May 2016

Police investigating the disappearance of a 44-year-old man have discovered human remains on a property, west of Brisbane.  The body was found in a lantana thicket on Saturday on a 31-acre property at Laidley West. Police were yet to confirm the identity of the remains, believed to be Darrell Simon who was reported missing in November 2014.

Read more:  http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-05-24/human-remains-found-on-laidley-west-property-near-brisbane/7441546

Jury in trial of Tyson Taylor accused of killing rugby league referee Tony McGrath to consider verdict

Courier Mail Thomas Chamberlin 23 May 2016

A JURY is expected to retire today to consider their verdict in the trial of the man accused of the murder of a rugby league referee who was executed in the garage of his Brisbane home.

Tyson Taylor, 41, has pleaded not guilty to shooting Tony McGrath at his Woolloongabba home in May 2013 after he ­allegedly botched an attempt to poison him, and kill him in a house fire in October 2012.

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How Trees Help Solve Murders

Atlas Obscura Cara Giaimo 20 May 2016

Twigs, seeds and pollen can help heat up otherwise cold cases.  For forensic botanists, plants make up a whole class of readily available witnesses.  The first botanist to branch out into forensics was Arthur Koehler, who, as a wood expert at the United States Forest Products Laboratory, lent his expertise to a number of cases in the 1920s and ’30s.

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CHI Announces the Inaugural DNA Forensics Conference, August 23-24, 2016, Washington, DC

Market Wired Cambridge Healthtech Institute 19 May 2016

This conference will examine new technologies, changing policies, and trends in forensic DNA investigations for industry and government agencies.

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Visit conference website

Body pulled from Brisbane River at Milton

ABC News 21 May 2016

A body has been found in the Brisbane River, which police say could have been submerged for some time.  The body, which police believe to be a man, was pulled from the river in Milton, at Coronation Drive, about 11:00am.

Officers are yet to identify the body.  Police were still at the scene on Saturday afternoon on the Bicentennial Bikeway, which is a popular route to and from the city.

View at source:  http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-05-21/body-pulled-from-brisbane-river/7434684

Law Week – Becoming a Scientific Officer

Qld Police Media 18 May 2016

Sergeant Lesley Walker is a Scientific Officer based in Cairns. She is one of those forensic scientists you see on all the best TV crime shows and indeed, it was her fascination for watching those shows that helped shape her career in the Queensland Police Service (QPS).
But in fact, her initial career choice had nothing to do with policing. Her first passion was marine biology and after school, she completed a Bachelor of Science majoring in biochemistry and marine biology followed by a year of honours at James Cook University in Townsville.

Read more: http://mypolice.qld.gov.au/blog/2016/05/18/law-week-becoming-scientific-officer/