Category Archives: Vector borne diseases

INCLUDES Arbovirus (Chikungunya, Dengue, Encephalitis, Japanese Encephalitis, Murray Valley Encephalitis, Ross River, West Nile), Insect-borne diseases, mosquitos, entomology with regard to mosquitos, emerging disease.
Use VIROLOGY for waterborne diseases.
EXCLUDES Bat-borne diseases (USE Hendra or Lyssavirus) .

Cracking the mystery of Zika virus replication

(Springer 26 July 2016) Zika virus has become a household word. It can cause microcephaly, a birth defect where a baby’s head is smaller than usual. Additionally, it is associated with Guillain-Barré syndrome, a neurological disorder that could lead to paralysis and even death. However, how this microbe replicates in the infected cells remains a mystery. Now, an international team has unraveled the puzzle of how Zika virus replicates and published their finding in Springer’s journal Protein & Cell.

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Antibodies identified that thwart Zika virus infection

(Washington University School of Medicine 27 July 2016) Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified antibodies capable of protecting against Zika virus infection, a significant step toward developing a vaccine, better diagnostic tests and possibly new antibody-based therapies.

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Could the deadly mosquito-borne yellow fever virus cause a Zika-like epidemic in the Americas?

EurekAlert! | Kathryn Ryan 27 July 2016

Yellow fever virus (YFV), a close relative of Zika virus and transmitted by the same type of mosquito, is the cause of an often-fatal viral hemorrhagic fever and could spread via air travel from endemic areas in Africa to cause international epidemics. The recent reemergence and spread of YFV in Africa and Asia and the dire shortage of YFV vaccine have called attention to the potential public health threat of yellow fever and the need for specific measures to prevent infection and control spread of the virus and its mosquito carrier.

Read more: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-07/mali-ctd072616.php

Read open-source study at Liebert (until 26 August 2016): http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/vbz.2016.2031

Request the source article from Information & Research Services (QH Staff only)

Cracking the mystery of Zika virus replication

EurekAlert! | June Tang 27 July 2016

Zika virus has now become a household word. It can cause microcephaly, a birth defect where a baby’s head is smaller than usual. Additionally, it is associated with Guillain-Barré syndrome, a neurological disorder that could lead to paralysis and even death. However, how this microbe replicates in the infected cells remains a mystery. Now, an international team led by researchers from Tianjin University and Nankai University has unraveled the puzzle of how Zika virus replicates and published their finding in Springer’s journal Protein & Cell.

Read more: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-07/s-ctm072616.php

Related open-source study at Protein & Cell: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs13238-016-0293-2

Researchers make new projections for spread of the Zika virus

(University of Notre Dame 25 July 2016) New research from the University of Notre Dame places a new upper limit on the total number of people who could become infected by the Zika virus in the first wave of the current epidemic.

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UTMB researchers find first direct evidence that A. aegypti mosquito transmits Zika virus

(University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston 21 July 2016) In collaboration with colleagues from Mexico, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston researchers were the first to directly connect the Aedes aegypti mosquito with Zika transmission in the Americas, during an outbreak in southern Mexico. The findings are available in the Journal of Infectious Diseases.The findings will help scientists to better target efforts for controlling the population of mosquitoes carrying the Zika virus.

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Is the end of Zika nigh? How populations develop immunity

The Conversation July 22, 2016

The Zika outbreak, arriving on the heels of Ebola and just in time for the Rio Olympics, has challenged global health agencies to respond rapidly and effectively. Determining the appropriate response is far from straightforward, though, as there is much we don’t yet know about the Zika virus.
A pair of papers published recently in the journal Science have reviewed current evidence about the spread and control of Zika. These studies use mathematical models to help understand how the virus may spread. Insights from these models can help to prioritise efforts to control Zika and minimise the harm it causes.

Read more: https://theconversation.com/is-the-end-of-zika-nigh-how-populations-develop-immunity-62816

Link to fulltext Science articles: http://science.sciencemag.org/content/early/2016/07/13/science.aaf8160 and http://science.sciencemag.org/content/early/2016/07/13/science.aag0219