Category Archives: zJournal articles

Is triclosan harming your microbiome?

Science  22 Jul 2016:  Vol. 353, Issue 6297, pp. 348-349
DOI: 10.1126/science.aag2698

Antibacterial soaps were originally used only in hospitals, but since the 1990s, their use has expanded into households. Antimicrobial chemicals are now found in many soaps, wipes, hand gels, cutting boards, detergents, cosmetics, and toothpastes, as well as toys and plastics. One of the most common antibacterials, triclosan [5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)phenol], is found in ∼75% of antibacterial soaps (1). In 2008, it was detected in ∼75% of urine samples in the United States (2). There are concerns that triclosan use contributes to the development of antibiotic resistance and may adversely affect human health. Partial bans exist in the European Union and the U.S. state of Minnesota (3, 4). However, recent studies exploring triclosan’s effect on the microbiome have given conflicting results.

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Journal of Clinical Microbiology – In Press articles – 20 July 2016

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Comparison of four commercial DNA extraction kits for the recovery of Bacillus spp. spore DNA from spiked powder samples

Journal of Microbiological Methods Available online 17 July 2016;  doi:10.1016/j.mimet.2016.07.013

Bacillus spp. include human pathogens such as Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax and a biothreat agent. Bacillus spp. form spores that are physically highly resistant and may remain active over sample handling. We tested four commercial DNA extraction kits (QIAamp DNA Mini Kit, RTP Pathogen Kit, ZR Fungal/ Bacterial DNA MiniPrep, and genesig Easy DNA/RNA Extraction kit) for sample inactivation and DNA recovery from two powders (icing sugar and potato flour) spiked with Bacillus thuringiensis spores. The DNA was analysed using a B. thuringiensis -specific real-time PCR assay. The detection limit was 3 x 101 CFU of spiked B. thuringiensis spores with the QIAamp DNA Mini, RTP Pathogen, and genesig Easy DNA/RNA Extraction kits, and 3 x 103 CFU with the ZR Fungal/Bacterial DNA MiniPrep kit. The results showed that manual extraction kits are effective and safe for fast and easy DNA extraction from powder samples even in field conditions. Adding a DNA filtration step to the extraction protocol ensures the removal of Bacillus spp. spores from DNA samples without affecting sensitivity.

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Water Research – Contents Pages

Table of Contents  |  Volume 101 September 2016

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Selected articles:

Quantifying potential sources of surface water contamination with Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli

Propidium monoazide RTqPCR assays for the assessment of hepatitis A inactivation and for a better estimation of the health risk of contaminated waters

The Lancet Infectious Diseases – Contents Pages

Table of Contents  |  Volume 16 Issue 8 August 2016

Selected articles: 

Zika virus in semen of a patient returning from a non-epidemic area

The global economic burden of dengue: a systematic analysis

Variable influenza vaccine effectiveness by subtype: a systematic review and meta-analysis of test-negative design studies

An Effort to Increase Organ Donor Registration Through Intergroup Competition and Electronic Word of Mouth.

J Health Commun. 2016;21(3):376-86. doi: 10.1080/10810730.2015.1095815

The effort to increase Web organ donation registrations in Michigan by enhancing 2 types of university campaigns with social media strategies informed by social identity theory is the focus of this research. The two campaigns focused on either ingroup or rivalry outgroup social identification, and each was enhanced with individually focused social media in the first year of the campaign and with electronic word of mouth in Year 2 of the campaign. Results indicated that individually focused social media such as Facebook ads worked well in rivalry campaigns (in which registrations increased two times over baseline) but not in ingroup identification campaigns (in which registrations decreased significantly over baseline when ads were introduced in the first year of each type of campaign). Electronic word-of-mouth strategies worked well in both ingroup identification campaigns (in which registrations increased two times over baseline) and rivalry campaigns (in which registrations rose almost eight times over baseline, when strategies were introduced in the second year of each type of campaign).

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Journal of Clinical Microbiology – In Press articles – 13 July 2016

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